Infection Prevention and Control Assessment at Kenya Red Cross Managed Health Facilities

Written By: Super User Category: Blog

Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a worldwide problem and have been a problem of health care facilities since their inception as institutions for the healing of the sick. These infections are acquired during (or are associated with) the provision of health care services, in contrast to infections that are already present or incubating at the time of a health care delivery episode.

Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a worldwide problem and have been a problem of health care facilities since their inception as institutions for the healing of the sick. These infections are acquired during (or are associated with) the provision of health care services, in contrast to infections that are already present or incubating at the time of a health care delivery episode. Although medical science has made significant advances in therapeutics, diagnostics, and knowledge of the disease process, the problem of HAIs persists throughout the world. To prevent, identify, monitor, and control the spread of infections in health care facilities, comprehensive infection prevention and control (IPC) practices are required.

The consistent use of IPC policies and guidelines ensures that IPC practices are carried out in a standard way across all health care facilities in Kenya. The practices and activities include: using scientifically sound measures for preventing and controlling infections ,monitoring health care practices, surveillance of infection in health care facilities, reporting IPC activities, providing adequate infrastructure, such as sinks and ventilation, and appropriate supplies and equipment, educating and training staff about IPC principles, educating patients, families, and members of the community in disease causation, prevention, and control , effectively managing IPC programmes and Periodically evaluating IPC policies and guidelines.

Kenya has updated its strategic plan on infection prevention and control (IPC) to respond to the heightened concerns about inappropriate IPC practices in health care settings in the country and the need for sustained preparedness and response in the wake of the occurrence of emerging and re-emerging infections such as the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. In line with this, Kenya Red Cross Society with support of the MOH division of Patient and Health Worker Safety, National and County level, International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement (IFRC) with funding from USAID, through the Community Epidemic and Pandemic preparedness programme ( CP3) conducted IPC assessment ( General and COVID -19 IPC ) in two health facilities in Turkana and Garissa counties.

Kenya Red Cross Society under its mandate of preventing and alleviating human suffering, has been in full support of the two health facilities in Kaloyebei and Dadaab which provides vital health support to refugee and host community since year 2013 and 2017 respectively. Key objectives of the assessment were to : Assessing infection hazards and risks at the individual and facility levels to enhance development and improvement of IPC activities over time, To strengthen community resilience against the effects of epidemics and pandemics, To provide evidence and expert based recommendations on the core components needed at the facility level to effectively prevent health care associated infections (HAIs) and Combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR), To support health care facilities to develop or strengthen IPC programmes and AMR action plans, and improve IPC practices through feasible, effective and acceptable framework that can be adapted to the local context, while taking into account of available resources and public health needs.